Literature Review

 

Bavis, Peter.  Detracked -- And Going Strong. [Earned Honors] (December 2016/January 2017) Phi Delta Kappan 98 (4), 37-42.

 

Berger, R., Rugen, L., & Woodfin, L. (2014). Leaders of their own learning: Transforming schools through student-engaged assessment. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

Cahill, Charlotte.  Making Work-Based Learning Work.  July 2016.  Jobs for the Future.

 

Charlton, J., Lepley, M., & Workman, E. (n.d.). Effects of Career Academies on Metropolitan Nashville Public High Schools: A Quantitative Study. Retrieved September, 2015.

  

Daggett, William Ed.D. & Nussbaum, Paul David Ed.D. How Brain Research Relates to Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships (2008).

 

Design, B. (n.d.). Evidence of Effectiveness. Retrieved August 01, 2014, from http://www.linkedlearning.org/about/evidence-of-effectiveness/ (James Irvine Foundation)

 

Farrington, C.A., Roderick, M., Allensworth, E., Nagaoka, J., Keyes, T.S., Johnson, D.W., & Beechum, N.O. (2012).Teaching adolescents to become learners. The role of noncognitive factors in shaping school performance:A critical literature review. Chicago: University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research.

 

Golann, Joann Wang & Hughes, Katherine L.  Dual Enrollment Policies and Procedures (2008) Community College Research Center.

 

Kemple, J., & Snipes, J. (2000, March). Career Academies: Impacts on Student Engagement and Performance in High School. MDRC.

 

Lafors, J., & Tameka, M. (2013, March). Expanding Access, Creating Options: How Linked Learning Pathways Can Mitigate Barriers to College and Career Access in Schools and District. The Education Trust - West, 1-20. Retrieved November, 2014.

 

Linked Learning.  On the Path to Success.  Retrieved November 2014.

 

Long Beach School District Accolades.  Retrieved December 2014.

 

McGlawn, T., Murray, L., & Hahnel, C. (n.d.). Unlocking Doors and Expanding Opportunity: Moving Beyond the Limiting Reality of College and K-12 Career Readiness in California High Schools. The Education Trust - West, 1-12.

 

National College and Career Readiness Indicators.  Retrieved January 2016.  AASA:  National Association of School Superintendents Initiative.

 

National Research Center for Career and Technical Education.  Career Pathways and Programs of Study.  Retrieved January 2015.

 

Noguera, P., Darling-Hammond, L., & Frielaender, D. (2015, October). Equal Opportunity for Deeper Learning. Jobs for the Future. 1 - 30.

 

Oxley, Diana PhD.  From High Schools to Learning Communities. (2008) NWREL.

 

Ruiz de Velasco, J., Newman, E., & Borsato, G. (2013, April). Equitable Access by Design. John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities, 1-36.

 

Sanders, Marisa.  (2013) Linked Learning:  A Guide to Making High School Work. University of California:  Los Angeles.

 

Stam, Brad.  (2011 January/February) The Power of Real-World Application.. Leadership, 12-15.

 

Symonds, William C., Robert Schwartz, and Ronald F. Ferguson. 2011. Pathways to prosperity: Meeting the challenge of preparing young Americans for the 21st century. Cambridge, MA: Pathways to Prosperity Project, Harvard University Graduate School of Education

 

US Department of Education.  (12 September 2016) Using Evidence to Create the Next Generation High Schools.

 

US Department of Education. (2001)  An Overview of Smaller Learning Communities in High Schools.  Retrieved January 2015.

 

Visher, M., & Stern, D. (2015, April). New Pathways to Careers and College Examples, Evidence, and Prospects. MDRC, 1-38.

  

Site Visits: The following list of schools were visited by one or more teams of MMSD staff in order to learn more about 1) their model for pathways and/or Academic and Career Planning 2) learn about their pathways implementation, strengths and challenges 3) their process for personalized supports to ensure all students had access for pathways enrollment.

 

Queens Vocational and Technical High School: Queens, NY

Date of Visit: Spring 2014

Focus of Visit: Smaller Learning Communities and Pathways Implementation

 

P-Tech: Brooklyn, NY

Date of Visit: Spring 2015

Focus of Visit: Alignment with post-secondary, business engagement and dual credit

 

Metropolitan Regional Career and Technical Center (MET)

Dates of Visit: Spring of 2015 and Fall of 2015

Focus of Visit: Personalized learning, experiential learning and pathways

 

Long Beach Unified (Jordan, Millikan, McBride, Cabrillo and CAMS) Long Beach, CA

Dates of Visit: Fall of 2014 - Spring of 2016

Focus of Visit: To learn about a district approach to pathways implementation, to learn about Linked Learning and school specific implementation.

Long Beach Linked Learning

 

Los Angeles Unified School District (Hollywood STEM Academy, LA School of the Arts)

Date of Visit:  November 2016

Focus of the Visit:  Schoolwide implementation of Linked Learning; schools with multiple pathways

 

Harborside Academy: Kenosha, WI

Dates of Visit: Fall 2015 - Spring of 2016

Focus of Visit: Academic and Career Planning and Socio-Emotional Learning

 

Antioch School District: Antioch, CA

Date of Visit: Spring 2016

Focus of Visit: To learn about implementation of Linked Learning as a Pathways Model

 

Rockford School District

Date of Visit: Fall of 2016

Focus of Visit: Participating district in the Great Lakes College and Career Initiative and learned about their pathways model and implementation.

  

Additional Schools and Districts that served as resources

 

Appleton School District

Resource: Provided information about scheduling and how to maintain access to Fine Arts, World Language within a pathways model

 

Nashville School District

Resource: Provided support regarding scheduling, ELL and Special Education supports